Social Media Marketing – is it REALLY all that new?

new2Let’s be real – Social Media Marketing isn’t really all that new…

We were clicking, viewing, commenting and sharing, long before the term ‘social media’ was coined.

The world of business is going mad for social media, with a recent study suggesting 92% of businesses in North America are using it in some way.

This is exciting of course, but in this excitement, many seem to have forgotten that while some of the technology may be new, the phenomena is not.

In fact, this interactive methodology has been at the core of internet marketing since its very inception. Web pages are, after all, interactive and multimedia by their very nature. We were clicking, viewing, commenting and sharing, long before the term ‘social media’ was coined.

In fact, ‘social’ has always been as aspect of marketing. So, how can the lessons of the past inform the way we approach social media marketing today?

Mistaken identities

What is new to many businesses trying out social media for the first time is the idea of anything other than direct selling. On your website, if you want to you can say what you do, why you are the best at it, ask people to buy and no one will bat an eyelid. The same goes for advertising, of course. But in the social media space, this is not so. Or at least, it can’t make up the majority of what you say.

If you’re familiar with networking in the real world, this will come as no surprise, but if you’re not and you try to use your social media profile as advertising space, you’ll be sorely disappointed at the results. Put simply, your social media profile should be more akin to your whole business persona, not just the advertising part of it.

In real life, you wouldn’t just sell, sell, sell (I hope), you would be informative, knowledgeable and helpful. Knowing the value of word of mouth, you would build connections, have conversations and generally get involved in your community. You would take an interest in others and sometimes, your conversations would be with a view to selling, but sometimes they wouldn’t.

Once you think of it like that, your social media strategy should look a whole lot clearer.

Same game, new pitch

So once we accept that social media goes beyond simple advertising, what else can we learn from the marketing that went before? What can we do to ensure it’s not just chat for chat’s sake?

Three techniques that can work wonders in the social media space are: offering free information, helping promote others reciprocally, and giving exclusive offers to others in the online ‘community’. But, again, these techniques are much older than the space they now inhabit.

Ever given out a free fact sheet to anyone that visits your office? Or helped out a person you meet at a conference by passing on the details of a third party? Or offered a ‘buy on get one free’ deal via your shop window?

These classic promotional techniques existed way before social media, so what’s the lesson here? A lot of social media marketing isn’t about reinventing the wheel, it’s about taking what we’ve collectively learned from other marketing activities (in our offices, at networking events, on our websites) and looking at how these can be carried through to our social networking personas.

Making it work for you

The beauty of social media is that the initial outlay is exceptionally cheap compared to many other forms of marketing. Get yourself a profile and then listen carefully to the buzz that’s happening around you. Follow people you’d like to emulate, and those you’d like as customers. Engage as a useful resource long before you begin to add straight sales techniques to the mix, and above all, keep it up. Again, just like any other form of marketing, social media is about keeping a consistent presence. Drift away, and so will your audience.

Need some help with your Social Media Marketing strategy? Give our Mentoring tryout package a try!

 

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Seven Sins of Internet Marketing

This article originally appeared on Business Zone

Untitled designNikki Pilkington looks at the mistakes entrepreneurs all too often make in a bid to get noticed online.

It’s so easy to start promoting a business online that many people seem to launch into it without much thought for the image they are portraying or the consequences of their actions.

Here are seven internet marketing faux pas, and the preferable alternatives.

1) Unfocussed, mass emailing

You acquire a huge list of random email addresses, tap out a nice salesy email about your business and send it out to everyone on the list in the hope that someone will find your offer relevant. Good marketing model? No. Spam? Yes.

Mass emailing with no target, and worse, no permission, is spam, pure and simple. Your mailing list should be entirely ‘opt in’ and the content you send should be relevant and useful to the recipients, even if that means writing slightly different mail outs for different groups.

2) Irrelevant content

You have read that lots of fresh content is the key to getting your site noticed, so you scour the internet for any free to use bits and pieces that vaguely relate to your offering and post them all over your site.

Posting any old nonsense on your site just to bump up content is a very, very bad idea. Not only could this be to the serious detriment of your credibility, it is also very unlikely to pull in relevant visitors, so you won’t benefit in real terms.

3) Content theft

In your quest for relevant, useful content, you come across some great posts on other people’s sites – perhaps even competitors. With a quick bit of cutting and pasting, you have reams of fresh, high quality content on your site.

Lifting content from other sites and publishing it on your own without permission is a seriously inadvisable. Unless clearly stated otherwise on the content owner’s site, you should always seek permission before republishing content. You should also include a credit and a link back to the original source.

4) Spamming forums

You want as many people as possible to hear about your new sales promotion, so you search for any forum with a relevant-ish topic and post your promotion verbatim on as many threads as you can. Before you know it, there are hundreds of references to your offer all over the web.

And the result of your efforts? You are seen as a spammer, banned from several forums, probably attacked in others, and people are generally rather annoyed with you. Remember, internet marketing via social media is about conversations, not shouting the loudest. By all means mention offers when they are relevant to the topic, but don’t expect to get results without putting time in to build relationships.

5) Falsifying testimonials

You’ve had a lovely new site developed for your new venture, and in the left hand column there’s a special section for displaying your best testimonials. In time, you’ll have some great things to put there, but right now, you’ve got nothing. You decide the best this to do is make a few up using generic names like Joan S and Bill P. It can’t hurt, can it?

Using false or unsubstantiated testimonials is another quick route towards losing any credibility and trust you command. Instead, use the space for something else and work on getting real testimonials by providing a great service.

6) Puffed up claims

Your company is newly formed, so you don’t feel you have many legitimately impressive claims to make yet. You know your employees have collectively worked for several blue chip firms, so you tell a little white lie and claim your company has served those firms. Well, it’s kind of true, isn’t it?

Bad idea. You could be threatened with legal action and suffer irreparable damage to your reputation. Be honest, work with what you’ve got, and publicise your achievements as they happen.

7) Abusing social media trends

Social media trends – the topics users are talking about most – can be a real temptation for internet marketers. Take Twitter, for example: it seems all you need to do is put the ‘tag’ for a current trend at the end of your ‘tweet’ and you’ll get seen. Who cares if the tag isn’t relevant if it gets you an audience? Well, your audience cares.

Abusing social media trends with irrelevant content has landed a few companies in hot water in recent months. Most famously, a ew years ago, a Habitat ‘intern’ caused some serious damage to the brand’s reputation when it put out promotional messages tagged with a reference to the Iran elections. Use tags honestly so that only those interested in what you offer will see your messages.

So the bad news is that it’s easy to get internet marketing wrong, but the good news is it is possible to get it right and get great results, so long as you have the time to invest and are willing to learn from the mistakes of others.

Want to get it right? Check out my Social Media Mentoring services!

 

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What’s new in 2014 for NikkiPilkington.com

What's NewWell, it’s 2014 – a new year, and lots of exciting plans ahead here at NP Towers! The first working week was spent putting alot of plans and infrastructure together. Processes have been mapped out, and customers imported into a CRM and Project Mnaagement tool (http://www.apptivo.com).

Now it’s full speed ahead for 2014!

New office hours

As of January 1st, my working hours will be:

Monday: Closed

Tuesday: 8am – 6pm

Wednesday: 8am – 6pm (this is my out of office day for meetings so I’ll be checking in on my phone)

Thursday: 8am – 6pm

Friday: 8am – 6pm

Saturday: Closed

Sunday: Closed

As a separated mum of a 3 year old, I’ve taken the decision in 2014 to be very rigid about my working hours. Mondays are ‘Mummy and Livi’ days (she goes to nursery the rest of the week, and weekends are for fun things. As the saying goes, no-one says on their death bed ‘I wish I’d worked more’…

New office

The second half of 2013 was the time I experimented with being in an office again – and to be honest it didn’t work well. Although it allowed me to separate work from home in principle, it didn’t really worklike that.

Internet issues, travelling time and other problems meant that I was still working late into the night – something I want to avoid in 2014.

So I’m moving things back home – the plan is to convert the loft into an office later in the year, but for now I have a lovely area set aside to work in and will be pretty strict with my time.

New packages

I’m working on some new packages based around logging, SEO and Social Media – feedback from potential clients have helped me to put these together and I’ll be rolling them out over the next few weeks.

New prices

I spent a lot of time over the Christmas and New Year period chatting to various business mentors and reading a lot of business books. And it has become clear that I need to change my pricing – somehting I’ve been very wary of in the past.

So, after looking at competitor prices and reading lots about ‘value perception’, I’ll be overhauling all of the pricing.

I still want to work primarily with small businesses, so it won’t be anything too drastic (for example the Bonkers Blogging Offer will be £150 instead of £99), but I only have so many hours in the day, and this will allow me to focus more on the customers I have, rather than constantly adding more to my workload.

New philosophy

After a slew of issues in 2013, personally, healthwise and businesswise, it has become clear to me that I need to be more strict about how I spend my time. I’m well aware that working from home can lead to disorganisation and distraction, so I aim to be very hard on work vs. home time! No avoiding writing that blog post because the washing up needs doing, thinking ‘I’ll deal with that once I’ve loaded the washing machine’, etc.

Home is home and work is work – never the twain shall meet!

Tell me in the comments what YOU’RE doing to change things for your business in 2014?

Online reputation management: what to do if your reputation takes a beating online

(This article originally appeared at Mad.co.uk)

Sad face

Sad face (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s every business’s worst internet nightmare: you head over to Google, tap in your company name to see how your web presence is coming along, and there in prominent position is something far from positive about your brand. Deserved or not, this entry could be damaging your business with every passing second.

Depending on the context, there are four main options available to you when faced with the threat of brand trashing: address it, remove it, bury it, prevent it.

Address it

Let’s look at bad mouthing. The power of the internet means that you can’t possibly control what people write about you – but your reputation can be made as much by how you respond to criticism as by the criticism itself.

When you stumble across a bad review, your first action should be to assess the comments as objectively as possible. Ask yourself, “Is this true? Have we done something to warrant this review?”

It’s all too easy to jump in and post a reply that’s defensive and perhaps even aggressive, but answering badly can just make you look worse. Instead, keep emotion out of it and aim to post a considered reply that answers the criticism calmly and factually.

If the review is warranted, it’s best to admit to any wrongdoing and say what you’re doing to fix the problem. This shows that you value your customers’ opinions and that you’re willing to correct your mistake. It’s then vital to follow up on any promises you have made.

It’s important to respond publicly, so even if you can’t give the full details, something as simple as, “Thanks for your comment, I’ve emailed you to find out more” could show that you’re working to address it and stop criticism spiralling further.

If you manage to resolve the problem at the root of the bad review, you can then post an update, and even encourage the original complainant to do so too.

Remove it

If a review or comment on a public forum is completely untrue, you can contact the site owner with an explanation and ask for it to be removed. However this will usually be down to their discretion so won’t work in every instance.

Sometimes, even deleted mentions can remain present in search results in the ‘cache’ – a sort of snap shot of how the page looked the last time the search engine checked. In such instances, you can submit a request that the search engine update their records (using Google’s webpage removal request tool or Bing’s support request form, choosing the ‘Content Removal Request’ option).

In the social media sphere, if you find someone pretending to represent your brand, sites such as Facebook or Twitter will usually respond quickly to remove imposters. Simply report the profile with evidence that it’s false.

If someone sets up a website with claims to be part of your brand, however, things aren’t quite so simple. If they won’t take it down on request, you next need to decide whether it’s worthwhile fighting it legally. In some cases, it might be that the fraudulent site has very little search engine visibility, so is only a minor threat that can be managed using a technique called ‘burying’.

Bury it

If a reviewer or site owner simply refuses to remove their content, no matter how unfair or untrue, you might wish to bury it. This involves ensuring that when your company name is searched for, mainly good things come up.

Let’s say your last client has said on GetSatisfaction that your service is rubbish. That review is here to stay and you don’t want other potential clients seeing it, so the objective is to dominate at least the first ten search results with positive things about your brand, effectively driving any bad mentions off the front page.

Social media profiles like Facebook and LinkedIn, as well as directory listings such as FreeIndex and BT Tradespace are perfect for this. Make sure those profiles are well populated with regularly updated content to keep them at the top of the search engines.

Prevent it

As with anything, prevention is better than cure. Don’t wait until you’re faced with a negative mention to start ensuring good things appear when people search for your brand.

It’s wise to buy up all likely domain name permutations of your brand (particularly your own country’s domain, plus .com), and sites like http://knowem.com/ or http://namechk.com/ will help you similarly reserve your brand name on social media sites.

Next, make sure anyone responsible for speaking on behalf of your brand online understands what they can and can’t say as company representatives.

Finally, have your response procedure planned out in advance, so you know exactly how you will deal with any problems well before they arise. If things do go wrong, be ready to answer criticism, keep emotion out of it, request removals where possible, and bury anything unfair that remains.

Need some help with bad publicity online? I am the owner/founder of NikkiPilkington.com, a 20 year old  internet marketing company based in the UK and France – drop me a line at nikkipilk@gmail.com and see if I can help!

 

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How can I get more people to see my posts on my Facebook Business Page?

screenshotfbpageThe recent news that Facebook is reducing the visibility of posts on Business Pages has had the small business community in uproar.

I’ve seen people deciding to give up their Business Page, ranting about Facebook, worrying that all their hard work will now go to waste, and more.

It appears that posts made on Business pages could now reach as little as 2% of ‘likers’ – I have almost 2500 likes, so this means that my posts could potentially only reach 50 people each time I post. For someone with only a few hundred likers, this number would be in single figures – hardly inspiring is it?

However, there is an answer. It involves a little work on the part of the Business Page owner, but it’s worth it in the long run if you want to make the most of your page without paying for promoted posts.

Currently your posts will only appear in the newsfeed of a small percentage of your likers. But did you know that your likers can CHOOSE to see your posts and be notified when you post? That’s personal choice and Facebook can’t get around that.

The problem is that most Facebook members don’t know about this facility so you’re going to have to tell them.

How do my Likers get notified?

When someone likes a page, a drop down box appears:

getnotifiedIf your liker clicks the ‘Get notifications’ option, a tick will appear next to it, and any post you make will appear in their notifications along with details of friends posts and updates. It’s THAT simple!

So what’s the catch?

Well, you’re going to have to let your current and future likers know. Which means individual messages to each of them, either telling them this or pointing them to this blog post (I recommend the latter 😉 ) It’s going to take time if you have a lot of likers, and not everyone will take you up on the offer, but it’s definitely worth doing if it helps you to increase your reach.

What should I say?

A simple message saying something like this should do:

Hi, as you know, Facebook have changed their rules recently so that even if you like my business page you may not see updates. However, there is a way that you can ensure you see my posts – simply click on the ‘Like’ button and when the drop down menu appears, tick ‘Get notifications’. For more info on this please see http://www.nikkipilkington.com/how-can-i-get-more-people-to-see-my-posts-on-my-facebook-business-page/

A few of these messages sent out a day should see your potential reach increase massively.

I don’t have time for that!

You could use a VA to do this, or someone like me. I’m offering this service as a part of my ‘Let me show you Facebook can work for you – for free!‘ offer. I’d recommend sending out 20 or so a day and monitoring your insights to see how your reach has increased.

Please do share this post on your Business Page, and other Social Media, so all small businesses can see how to get around this.

And of course you can Like my Business Page and follow me on Twitter 🙂

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Which of these mistakes are you making on Twitter?

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...

Image via CrunchBase

Let’s be honest, using Twitter isn’t exactly brain surgery. A short 140-character message that you send out to your Followers is hardly a strain. Yet knowing how to effectively Twitter for Business without annoying people seems to elude even some of the sharpest minds. There is a Twittiquette and if you want to use Twitter to promote your business, you need to stop making these TEN irritating mistakes:

ONE – MOANING
There’s no better way to drive your followers away than spend your entire time on Twitter moaning about this and that irrelevancies. It’s fine to have an opinion, it perhaps makes people engage with you, but if you’re just there to complain about your love life, stop Twittering and go on the Jeremy Kyle show.

TWO – TXT ABBRVTNS
Stpd pple use txt abbrtns on Twttr! It might be good if you’re a cheapskate trying to save money on your mobile phone bill, but Twitter is free. Surely you have sufficient grasp of the English language to actually make your message fit into 140 characters without resorting to txtspk. Avoid looking like a twt by avoiding text abbreviations.

THREE – ADVERTISING FOR FOLLOWERS
One of the best things about Twitter is that people follow you out of interest or allegiance; they don’t follow you because you ask them to do so. By advertising for followers, you end up looking rather desperate, devaluing your current followers and distancing potential followers.

FOUR – WITTERING ON
By ‘wittering’, I’m talking about the frequency of your Tweets. If you spend a lot of time on Twitter, tweeting to everyone, all the time, very soon they’ll get sick of you. People soon sicken of anything they get too much of, don’t get blocked for wittering.

FIVE – STUPID NAMES
HotJenna may work for HotMedia but HotJenna sounds like a porn star. Your Twitter name is all part of your brand, would you put ‘HotJenna’ as your email address? The informality of Twitter blinds people to the fact that you are still representing and promoting your business online. Twitter is great for spreading the word about your company or business. It’s the Internet version of word-of- mouth.

SIX – SPAM SANDWICHES
As soon as Twitter became a useful business tool, some other tool started using it for spamming. By now, Twitter users are so used to being spammed, that they respond with enthusiasm and affection to human contact from real people. Don’t spam, make connections, people will appreciate it.

SEVEN – AUTO RESPONDERS
It’s just sloppy Twittering to care so little about your Followers that you just use Auto-Responders. How impersonal! How bad for business! It’s simple, Twitter offers a personal connection to people, if you disregard that, your followers will disappear faster than an MP with an inappropriate expenses claim.

EIGHT – FIGHT CLUB
Twitter is absolutely NOT a tool to help you gossip, bitch, bitch slap or attack people. I mean, it’s fun, but it’s bad for your image, your credibility and it leaves you looking like a petty bully. It’s okay to speak your mind, within reason, but it’s not a place to engage in fighting.

NINE – NO BIO
Once someone follows you, they may be interested enough to find out more about you. What happens when they find you haven’t even bothered to fill in your bio? They figure out that you’re not in this to make connections, it’s just another tool to try to get their business. Or perhaps you’re one of those people that signs up, adds people but never Tweets! Build credibility and relationships by adding a bio, go on, you must have SOMETHING good to say about yourself.

TEN – NO AVATAR
Nothing screams ‘I’m new to this’ like failing to brand your Twitter account with an appropriate Avatar. You can use your photo or your company logo, but being an egg or a comedy avatar just makes you look lazy, like you don’t care about the impression that you make on others.

So, if you’ve made some of these mistakes, and you want to make less, or you’d like to see your business grow as a result of using Twitter, why not take a look at my mentoring service where I can help you make the most of Twitter and more?

 

 

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NikkiPilkington 12 Days of Christmas song

The Singing Christmas Tree, Werdmühleplatz in ...

Image via Wikipedia

All together now!

On the first day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

A first place on Google for me

On the second day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the third day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the fourth day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the fifth day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the sixth day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

6 tweets for Twitter,
5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the seventh day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

7 brand new meta tags,
6 tweets for Twitter,
5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the 8th day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

8 sales from Facebook,
7 brand new meta tags,
6 tweets for Twitter,
5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the 9th day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

9 SEO tips,
8 sales from Facebook,
7 brand new meta tags,
6 tweets for Twitter,
5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the 10th day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

10 brand new Challenges,
9 SEO tips,
8 sales from Facebook,
7 brand new meta tags,
6 tweets for Twitter,
5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the 11th day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

11 ways to get links,
10 brand new Challenges,
9 SEO tips,
8 sales from Facebook,
7 brand new meta tags,
6 tweets for Twitter,
5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

On the 12th day of Christmas, Nikki gave to me:

12 hours of mentoring,
11 ways to get links,
10 brand new Challenges,
9 SEO tips,
8 sales from Facebook,
7 brand new meta tags,
6 tweets for Twitter,
5 great reviews…
4 Foursquare checkins,
3 ideas for blog posts,
2 new subscribers, and
A first place on Google for me

Happy Christmas everyone and here’s to a fab 2012!

Thanks to Suze St Maur for the idea 🙂 )

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How to cook your Christmas turkey in the dishwasher and live to tell the tale

So, a week before Xmas my oven decides to stop working. All the local shops can’t deliver a new one for 6 weeks, and I have 7 for Christmas dinner… aarrrgghhh!

So what did I do? I turned to trusty Twitter and Facebook for an answer. After posting out my plea, I received back many ideas:

  • microwave it
  • BBQ it
  • deep fry it
  • cook it in the dishwasher

Yep, that’s right, cook it in the dishwasher.

Now, I admit that one of the other three options must be easier than the dishwasher suggestion, but come on – when have I backed down in the face of a challenge? The dishwasher it must be!

I told the family and they looked at me aghast. “Cook the turkey… in the dishwasher….?” All except Leigh, who said “What a great idea for a blog post!” (glad to see she inherited my nose for drama 😉 )

And so, on Xmas morning we duly got out the turkey:

1Well, to be honest it was a Chapon not a turkey as such, but it once had feathers and laid eggs so I’m not quibbling 🙂

The recipes I found online said to wrap it in stemaing bags – we didn’t have any so we extra quadruple wrapped it in thick turkey foil while we were running the dishwasher through on empty to make sure it was clean.

2Then into the dishwasher it went:

3Here’s the turkey in it’s home for the next few hours:

4It was a 3.5KG bird, so we put it through 4 cycles at the highest temperature (75 deg) – checking it after each cycle to see if it really was cooking. Leigh was on standby with chicken nuggets if it didn’t, and my partner mentioned many times how glad he was having fish that could be cooked in the microwave (wuss!)

After 4 cycles, we unwrapped it and took a look:

5It was cooked! OK, it was a bit pale and anaemic looking, but nothing a quick blast in the microwave grill and copious amounts of gravy couldn’t sort out.

Most importantly, it tasted yummy – moist, flavourful, and very definitely edible – with not a trace of detergent to be found 😉

The rest of the Christmas dinner was cooked in the halogen oven we borrowed, in pans and in the microwave, so it was a bit of a ‘take it as you find it’ affair, but all in all it worked well and everyone had a lovely Christmas dinner, as well as having created a bit of a talking point!

They tell me I’m brave to have tried it on such an important meal; there’s a thin line between bravery and stupidity; I’m not sure which side I’m on LOL!

So for those of you who thought it couldn’t be done – it can! For those of you who thought I wouldn’t do it – I did! And for those of you who want to try it – do it! It really didn’t take much longer than cooking the traditional way, and the end result was most pleasant.

What would you have done with your Christmas turkey if your oven broke a few days before Christmas?

67 SEO Pointers for Blogging Beginners – a free guide

3D Team Leadership Arrow ConceptLots of the questions I get on Twitter and Facebook relate to blogging and SEO, and as I was typing up a quick and dirty guide to SEO Blogging for a client, I mentioned it to someone else and they asked for a copy. Then I mentioned it on Twitter and others asked. So I tidied it up a (little) bit, put it in PDF format and here it is 🙂

It covers:

  • Thinking of what to write
  • What not to blog
  • How much should I write?
  • How do I get people to comment?
  • Should I tweet and facebook my blogs?
  • Blogging for SEO – a quick and dirty guide
  • Making sure Google knows about your blogs

It’s not an advanced guide, it’s not rocket science and hopefully it’s not full of jargon.

I’m offering it free – all I ask is that if you like it, you drop me a line in one of the many places you can find me, and then direct someone else to this page by either Tweeting about it, Facebooking it, mentioning it on Linked in, writing a blog post about it, or shouting on the High Street with a megaphone (special kudos to those of you who do the latter!).

Get it free now by subscribing to our Blogging & SEO Newsletter below:

Would you like an hour of a Social Media Marketing Specialist’s time?

Telephone

Telephone (Photo credit: plenty.r.)

*** STOP PRESS *** First 10 places gone – price now increased to £50 for next 10 places!

I ran this service a while ago, and it went really well, but time constraints and lack of internet stability meant I had to stop – but I’m back!

Nikki’s Social Media Marketing Telephone Mentoring

It’s easy to read generic information, advice and tips about Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Blogging, SEO, Pinterest etc, but it’s not so easy to apply this specifically to your own website.

And while you’re spending all of your time learning and practising the new skills you’ve learned, who is running your business?

While I fully believe it’s possible to learn everything you need to know just by reading, sometimes you need a little extra help.

Imagine if someone could advise you:

  • How many times a day to post to Facebook
  • How to get interaction on Twitter
  • How best to direct people to your blog
  • What could be improved in your SEO
  • What you’re not doing with LinkedIn that you could be
  • When you should be posting to Pinterest
  • as well as answering any questions you have
  • and more!

Well that’s what this service is for!

In a one hour phone call with me, Nikki Pilkington, you’ll learn all the above and more. You’ll also get a follow up email detailing everything we’ve spoken about, as well as suggesting 5 blog post titles you should be writing.

In addition you’ll have email or Facebook chat access to me for 2 weeks afterwards.

OK, I need your help, how much?

In the future I will be £75 per call for this service, but as I’ve not offered the service for a while, the next 10 people to sign up and book their call will get this fantastic service for just £50.

£50 for 19 years of internet marketing knowledge.

£50 for a personalised plan of action.

£50 for 14 days access to me.

£50 to find out where you’re going wrong, and how to put it right.

You’ve probably spent more than £50 of your time just reading and testing the things you’ve read, right?

I’m in – how do I book?

Using the Paypal link below, you can book your session. Upon completion of payment, you will be returned to our calendar where you can book your call at a time of your choosing.

Remember, the next 10 only will be £50 – after that the price will revert to £75. So book now and let’s get your social media marketing and SEO back on track!




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